Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Hail, hail, the gangs all...damaged...

Ok, the hail can stop anytime, now.  My poor garden looks like I let my kids loose with BB guns there.  Holes through most everything and my salad greens have been beaten down flat.  The arugula seems to love this weather as I can barely keep up with it.


The zucchini leaves took a hail beating but they are strong so I expect no problems.  Just about ready to get some fruit to start, and if we get more than 2, we're cooking with gas. 


All the butternut squash and pumpkin plants are flowering, too.  This squash is in the straw bale on top of a raised bed.  This year is looking so much better than the last.  Seeds for a fall harvest have just gone in, so I may have home-grown pumpkins at Halloween.


The jalapeño plant that wasn't eaten has produced 3 fruits, so I'm way ahead of the curve on peppers, too.   The pepper plant I'm experimenting with in the greenhouse grow-bag has started flowering.   Also, I have a purple sweet pepper in the other bed that has put out flowers, so my excitement is growing.  This bed may be doing better than last year because of the black plastic under the plants.  It seems to have raised the temperature enough that they love it.  Maybe next year I'll also try red plastic under the outside tomato plants.

2 comments:

  1. We haven't grown Jalapeños yet but grew Serrano peppers and Red, Orange & Green Bell peppers last year. We had so many we were giving them to neighbors. Our tomatoes didn't do worth a hoot. I've never done well with tomatoes. Wish I did b/c we love them. Our neighbor has had a bumper crop of them this year and he has been sharing with us. They've been so good. Very sweet. I'm just growing herbs this year.

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  2. We started years ago in Phx area with a salsa garden (tomatoes, onions, jalapenos, cilantro) and zucchini. I could grow anything there. Up here, it's a struggle. Everything I love wants hot weather.
    Adding black plastic behind the tomatoes has made them produce. I put it up poles to the north of the plants and it seems to reflect heat to them.

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